Mind Potion Network
Monday, 30 April 2012
Dad talks to his dead daughter after developing paranormal detection devices
Mood:  chatty
Topic: Paranormal

A grief-stricken electrical engineer believes he has found a way to communicate with his dead daughter eight years after her death.

Using his expertise to design and build a series of electromagnetic detection devices, Gary Galka claims to have even recorded his eldest daughter Melissa saying, 'Hi Daddy, I love you.'

Devastated by his girl's death in a car accident on her way home in 2004 at the age of 17, Gary and his family claim they started to experience unexplained phenomena at their Connecticut home days after the fatal accident, according to the Hartford Courant.

Full Story from dailymail.co.uk


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Monday, 30 April 2012 01:09 MEST
Sunday, 29 April 2012
The Power of Failure.....Best Motivation Video Ever
Mood:  happy
Topic: Inspirational

Brooding over your failures? No one rides unbridled success all the time. This film provides compelling examples of strong people who, undaunted by their failures, drove themselves to the pinnacles of success. This film reminds us: to fail is to live.


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Sunday, 29 April 2012 02:14 MEST
Saturday, 28 April 2012
The Benefits of Daydreaming
Mood:  bright
Topic: Dreams


Does your mind wander? During a class or meeting, do you find yourself staring out the window and thinking about what you’ll do tomorrow or next week? As a child, were you constantly reminded by teachers to stop daydreaming?

Well, psychological research is beginning to reveal that daydreaming is a strong indicator of an active and well-equipped brain. Tell that to your third-grade teacher.

A new study, published in Psychological Science by researchers from the University of Wisconsin and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science, suggests that a wandering mind correlates with higher degrees of what is referred to as working memory. Cognitive scientists define this type of memory as the brain’s ability to retain and recall information in the face of distractions.

Full Story from smithsonianmag.com


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Saturday, 28 April 2012 01:18 MEST
Friday, 27 April 2012
Salt......friend or foe?
Mood:  happy
Topic: Health


For many years we have been told by medical experts and nutritionists alike that it is crucial for our health to cut down on sodium as much as possible. Statistical data seems to show that a high dietary salt intake (primarily consisting in sodium chloride) can put people at risk of cardiovascular complications.

Consequently, salt has been vilified to such extent in the media that may people strive to remove it from their diets completely. But is wiping salt out of the menu really a wise choice? According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, not exactly.

To understand both why salt is healthy and why it has the potential to be dangerous, let's look at what it can do for us. The primary biological role of sodium is to regulate blood volume and blood pressure by maintaining adequate body fluid levels. When the kidneys detect too little sodium levels in the body, they decrease sodium excretion. But when there is too much sodium, an antidiuretic hormone kicks in and causes the body to retain water. The kidneys will then try to gradually release excess sodium and water through urine, thus bringing the body's fluid and sodium levels back within normal ranges.

Water and salts are also lost through excessive perspiration, associated with hot climates and physical effort. This can severely offset the body's internal regulating mechanisms, and adequate rehydration is advised as soon as possible. In normal conditions however, sodium regulation is left almost entirely up to the kidneys. Medical experts usually warn us that if for some reason, the kidneys are unable to excrete excess sodium, the increased blood volume will exert extra pressure on blood vessels and make the heart work harder.

But now scientists say that too little sodium is just as bad. On the one hand, sodium deficiency can cause a range of problems, including headaches, nausea, fatigue and muscle cramps. On the other hand, commercially available foods contain large amounts of hidden salt which makes it difficult for people on a traditional diet to control their sodium intake.

The research of professors Martin J. O'Donnell and Salim Yusuf of McMaster University in Ontario, Canada now reveals that if we have very low levels of sodium in urine, we are at risk of cardiovascular death and congestive heart failure. The study looked at 28,880 people, with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, over a seven-year period.

The scientists explained that "clarifying the optimal daily intake of sodium is particularly important in patients with established cardiovascular disease, where it has been inadequately studied." However, there is no scientific consensus as of yet regarding optimal salt intake, since body sodium levels also depend on how much an individual sweats.

"As a general rule, if people are adding salt to their diet they are taking in too much and they are on the higher end of our spectrum. The first thing people need to do is stop adding salt," said O'Donnell. Fortunately, certain foods are naturally rich in sodium and can help balance a diet without added salts. Seaweed, green leafy vegetables and tuberous vegetables are natural sources of sodium, as well as other essential salts, such as magnesium and potassium.

Sources for this article include:

http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/main/news/news_2011/sodium_intake_study.html

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/238164.php

http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1091079

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sodium/NU00284

About the author:

Raw Michelle is a natural health blogger and researcher, sharing her passions with others, using the Internet as her medium. She discusses topics in a straight forward way in hopes to help people from all walks of life achieve optimal health and well-being. She has authored and published hundreds of articles on topics such as the raw food diet and green living in general. In 2010, Michelle created RawFoodHealthWatch.com, to share with people her approach to the raw food diet and detoxification.

Article Source - naturalnews.com


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Friday, 27 April 2012 01:09 MEST
Thursday, 26 April 2012
Neolithic acoustics of Stonehenge revealed by academics
Mood:  loud
Topic: Archaeology


A team of academics have revealed the "sonic experience" that early visitors to Stonehenge would have heard.

Scholars from the Universities of Salford, Huddersfield and Bristol used an American replica of the monument to investigate its audio history.

Salford's Dr Bruno Fazenda said they had found the site reacted to sound "in a way that would have been noticeable to the Neolithic man".

He said the research would allow a "more holistic" view of its past.

The acoustic experiments could not be carried out at Stonehenge, as the derelict state of the site meant only a "few weak echoes and no noticeable reverberation" could be studied.

As a result, the team used a full-sized concrete reconstruction of it in Maryhill, America, which was built in 1929 as a memorial to WWI soldiers.

In February, scientist Steven Waller published a paper suggesting the design of Stonehenge could have been inspired by music.

Full Story from BBC


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Thursday, 26 April 2012 02:08 MEST
Wednesday, 25 April 2012
Positive Feelings May Help Protect Cardiovascular Health
Mood:  happy
Topic: Positive Thinking


Over the last few decades numerous studies have shown negative states, such as depression, anger, anxiety, and hostility, to be detrimental to cardiovascular health. Less is known about how positive psychological characteristics are related to heart health. In the first and largest systematic review on this topic to date, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that positive psychological well-being appears to reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular events.

The study was published online April 17, 2012 in Psychological Bulletin.

The American Heart Association reports more than 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each day, an average of one death every 39 seconds. Stroke accounts for about one of every 18 U.S. deaths.

Full Story from sciencedaily.com


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Wednesday, 25 April 2012 01:40 MEST
Tuesday, 24 April 2012
Walking could be a useful tool in treating depression
Mood:  chatty
Topic: Alternative Health


Something as simple as going for a brisk stroll could play an important role in fighting depression, according to researchers in Scotland.

Vigorous exercise has already been shown to alleviate symptoms of depression, but the effect of less strenuous activities was unclear.

A study in the journal Mental Health and Physical Activity showed walking had a "large effect" on depression.

One in 10 people may have depression at some point in their lives.

The condition can be treated with drugs, but exercise is commonly prescribed by doctors for mild symptoms.

Full Story from BBC


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Tuesday, 24 April 2012 01:43 MEST
Monday, 23 April 2012
Henry, an iPod, and the Alchemy of Music
Mood:  bright
Topic: Inspirational

Alive Inside, a documentary premiering next week in New York, investigates a social worker's attempt to engage seniors with dementia and Alzheimer's at a nursing home. When he discovers how well it works, he brings in neurologist Oliver Sacks, and the two embark on an experiment to see music's impact on this population.

The video above has become a viral hit as more people discover it, and it's no surprise -- people's connection with music, particularly music from their younger years, elicits strong emotions, and some researchers have even suggested it as a necessity for people.

Ray Mueller, a member of the Shumei Arts Council of America’s Advisory Board, told Psychology Suite 101, “Research has located specific areas of mental activity linked to emotional responses to music. It seems music is a human need and the brain is able to act as a function to satisfy that need.”

For older populations, music has been associated with everything from helping uncover memories in patients with Alzheimer's to reducing falls during exercise.

The video is also affiliated with Music & Memory, an organization dedicated to helping seniors connect to music, including collecting used iPods for donation.

Article Source - dailygood.org


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Monday, 23 April 2012 01:09 MEST
Sunday, 22 April 2012
Mystery of Human Consciousness Illuminated
Mood:  lyrical
Topic: Hypnosis & Psychology


Awakening from anesthesia is often associated with an initial phase of delirious struggle before the full restoration of awareness and orientation to one's surroundings. Scientists now know why this may occur: primitive consciousness emerges first. Using brain imaging techniques in healthy volunteers, a team of scientists led by Adjunct Professor Harry Scheinin, M.D. from the University of Turku, Turku, Finland in collaboration with investigators from the University of California, Irvine, USA, have now imaged the process of returning consciousness after general anesthesia. The emergence of consciousness was found to be associated with activations of deep, primitive brain structures rather than the evolutionary younger neocortex. These results may represent an important step forward in the scientific explanation of human consciousness.

The study was part of the Research Programme on Neuroscience by the Academy of Finland.

"We expected to see the outer bits of brain, the cerebral cortex (often thought to be the seat of higher human consciousness), would turn back on when consciousness was restored following anesthesia. Surprisingly, that is not what the images showed us.

Full Story from sciencedaily.com


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Sunday, 22 April 2012 02:12 MEST
Saturday, 21 April 2012
Fretting is a useful defence mechanism
Mood:  bright
Topic: Human Nature


Anyone who's lain awake at night worrying over work or money might find it improbable - but worrying is a beneficial trait.

Humans evolved worrying alongside intelligence - perhaps as a defense mechanism in a dangerous world where early humans had to fight for survival.


'While excessive worry is generally seen as a negative trait and high intelligence as a positive one, worry may cause our species to avoid dangerous situations, regardless of how remote a possibility they may be.' said Dr. Coplan of SUNY (State University of No York.'

'In essence, worry may make people 'take no chances,' and such people may have higher survival rates. Thus, like intelligence, worry may confer a benefit upon the species.'

High intelligence and worry  both deplete the same nutrient in the brain's white matter - suggesting they evolved at the same time.

Worry might actually be a useful trait that helped our species to survive.

Full Story from dailymail.co.uk


Posted by mindpotion Network at 01:01 MEST
Updated: Saturday, 21 April 2012 01:44 MEST

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